Tending the Wild

Tending the Wild Author Kat Anderson
ISBN-10 0520248511
Year 2006
Pages 526
Language en
Publisher Univ of California Press
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Demonstrates how Native American knowledge and uses of California's natural resources can contribute to contemporary conservation efforts, exploring the land management practices that Native Americans recall from their grandparents, such as how and when areas were burned, which plants were eaten and which were used for basketry, and how plants were tended. Original.

Tending the Wild

Tending the Wild Author M. Kat Anderson
ISBN-10 9780520933101
Year 2005-06-14
Pages 555
Language en
Publisher Univ of California Press
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John Muir was an early proponent of a view we still hold today—that much of California was pristine, untouched wilderness before the arrival of Europeans. But as this groundbreaking book demonstrates, what Muir was really seeing when he admired the grand vistas of Yosemite and the gold and purple flowers carpeting the Central Valley were the fertile gardens of the Sierra Miwok and Valley Yokuts Indians, modified and made productive by centuries of harvesting, tilling, sowing, pruning, and burning. Marvelously detailed and beautifully written, Tending the Wild is an unparalleled examination of Native American knowledge and uses of California's natural resources that reshapes our understanding of native cultures and shows how we might begin to use their knowledge in our own conservation efforts. M. Kat Anderson presents a wealth of information on native land management practices gleaned in part from interviews and correspondence with Native Americans who recall what their grandparents told them about how and when areas were burned, which plants were eaten and which were used for basketry, and how plants were tended. The complex picture that emerges from this and other historical source material dispels the hunter-gatherer stereotype long perpetuated in anthropological and historical literature. We come to see California's indigenous people as active agents of environmental change and stewardship. Tending the Wild persuasively argues that this traditional ecological knowledge is essential if we are to successfully meet the challenge of living sustainably.

Tending the Wild

Tending the Wild Author Kat Anderson
ISBN-10 9780520238565
Year 2005-06-14
Pages 526
Language en
Publisher Univ of California Press
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"This is a highly significant—one might argue revolutionary—book. It, and the author's previous research, has the potential to completely change the way western land managers relate to the land and the resources they are trying to regulate. Even more, it has the power to influence the way that all of us approach Nature and will reinforce the importance of Native Americans and the sophistication of their knowledge."—Nancy J. Turner, University of Victoria "Tending the Wild is an enormously rich and highly readable text on the remarkably diverse land management techniques practiced by California Indians over millennia. This book serves as an invaluable resource as we strive to conserve California's enormous cultural and biotic heritage in the new century. A triumph!"—Michael H. Horn, California State University Fullerton "Tending the Wild supports the little know fact that Indian groups in California historically practiced a kind of "environmental bonsai" through their centuries long management activities. Kat Anderson's work is timely and will make an important contribution toward a better understanding of the historic ecologies of North America."—Greg Cajete, University of New Mexico

Keeping it Living

Keeping it Living Author Douglas Deur
ISBN-10 0774812672
Year 2005-01-01
Pages 404
Language en
Publisher University of Washington Press
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Keeping It Living brings together some of the world’smost prominent specialists on Northwest Coast cultures to examinetraditional cultivation practices from Oregon to Southeast Alaska. Itexplores tobacco gardens among the Haida and Tlingit, managed camasplots among the Coast Salish of Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia,estuarine root gardens along the central coast of British Columbia,wapato maintenance on the Columbia and Fraser Rivers, and tended berryplots up and down the entire coast. With contributions from a host of experts, Native American scholarsand elders, Keeping It Living documents practices ofmanipulating plants and their environments in ways that enhancedculturally preferred plants and plant communities. It describes howindigenous peoples of this region used and cared for over 300 speciesof plants, from the lofty red cedar to diminutive plants of backwaterbogs.

The Tanoak Tree

The Tanoak Tree Author Frederica Bowcutt
ISBN-10 9780295805931
Year 2015-06-08
Pages 240
Language en
Publisher University of Washington Press
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Tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) is a resilient and common hardwood tree native to California and southwestern Oregon. People�s radically different perceptions of it have ranged from treasured food plant to cash crop to trash tree. Having studied the patterns of tanoak use and abuse for nearly twenty years, botanist Frederica Bowcutt uncovers a complex history of cultural, sociopolitical, and economic factors affecting the tree�s fate. Still valued by indigenous communities for its nutritious acorn nut, the tree has also been a source of raw resources for a variety of industries since white settlement of western North America. Despite ongoing protests, tanoaks are now commonly killed with herbicides in industrial forests in favor of more commercially valuable coast redwood and Douglas-fir. As one nontoxic alternative, many foresters and communities promote locally controlled, third-party certified sustainable hardwood production using tanoak, which doesn�t depend on clearcutting and herbicide use. Today tanoaks are experiencing massive die-offs due to sudden oak death, an introduced disease. Bowcutt examines the complex set of factors that set the stage for the tree�s current ecological crisis. The end of the book focuses on hopeful changes including reintroduction of low-intensity burning to reduce conifer competition for tanoaks, emerging disease resistance in some trees, and new partnerships among tanoak defenders, including botanists, foresters, Native Americans, and plant pathologists.

Native American Ethnobotany

Native American Ethnobotany Author Daniel E. Moerman
ISBN-10 0881924539
Year 1998
Pages 927
Language en
Publisher Timber Press
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An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other things. Anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman has devoted 25 years to the task of gathering together the accumulated ethnobotanical knowledge on more than 4000 plants. More than 44,000 uses for these plants by various tribes are documented here. This is undoubtedly the most massive ethnobotanical survey ever undertaken, preserving an enormous store of information for the future.

Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Natural Resource Management

Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Natural Resource Management Author Charles R. Menzies
ISBN-10 0803207352
Year 2006
Pages 281
Language en
Publisher U of Nebraska Press
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Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Natural Resource Management examines how traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) is taught and practiced today among Native communities. Of special interest is the complex relationship between indigenous ecological practices and other ways of interacting with the environment, particularly regional and national programs of natural resource management. Focusing primarily on the northwest coast of North America, scholars look at the challenges and opportunities confronting the local practice of indigenous ecological knowledge in a range of communities, including the Tsimshian, the Nisga’a, the Tlingit, the Gitksan, the Kwagult, the Sto:lo, and the northern Dene in the Yukon. The experts consider how traditional knowledge is taught and learned and address the cultural importance of different subsistence practices using natural elements such as seaweed (Gitga’a), pine mushrooms (Tsimshian), and salmon (Tlingit). Several contributors discuss the extent to which national and regional programs of resource management need to include models of TEK in their planning and execution. This volume highlights the different ways of seeing and engaging with the natural world and underscores the need to acknowledge and honor the ways that indigenous peoples have done so for generations.

Secrets of the Oak Woodlands

Secrets of the Oak Woodlands Author Kate Marianchild
ISBN-10 159714262X
Year 2014
Pages 202
Language en
Publisher
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Richly illustrated this book combines extensive research and years of personal experience to explore the diverse plants and animals that the oak woodlands nurture.

Chumash Ethnobotany

Chumash Ethnobotany Author Janice Timbrook
ISBN-10 1597140481
Year 2007
Pages 271
Language en
Publisher Heyday Books
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From islands off the shore of Santa Barbara to the chaparral-covered mountains of the dry inland regions, the land of the Chumash is a storehouse of plants, an area of great biological richness and variety. Living intimately within this land for more than nine thousand years, the Chumash developed an intense and sophisticated relationship with the plants around them. They collected and processed nuts, seeds, berries, roots, leaves, twigs, shoots, and wood from which they created practically everything they needed to live, from medicines to weapons to decorative items.

Indian Fishing

Indian Fishing Author Hilary Stewart
ISBN-10 1926706390
Year 2008-09-01
Pages 181
Language en
Publisher D & M Publishers
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The Northwest Coast people devised ingenious ways of catching the different species of fish, creating a technology vastly different from that of today’s industrial world. With attention to clarity and detail, Hilary Stewart illustrates their hooks, lines, sinkers, lures, floats, clubs, spears, harpoons, nets, traps, rakes and gaffs, showing how these were made and used in over 450 drawings and 75 photographs. One section demonstrates how the catch was butchered, cooked, rendered and preserved. The spiritual aspects of fishing are described as well — prayers and ceremonies in gratitude and honour to the fish, customs and taboos indicating the people’s respect for this life-giving resource. The fish designs on household and ceremonial objects are depicted — images that tell of fishing’s importance to the whole culture.

Grass Games Moon Races

Grass Games   Moon Races Author Jeannine Gendar
ISBN-10 0930588568
Year 1995
Pages 125
Language en
Publisher Heyday
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Grade level: Brings to life the extraordinary diversity of native California Indian games. Indian football, shinny, cat's cradle, hoop-and-pole game, dice, grass game, peon, games of skill and games of chance.

In the Land of the Grasshopper Song

In the Land of the Grasshopper Song Author Mary Ellicott Arnold
ISBN-10 0803267037
Year 1980
Pages 313
Language en
Publisher U of Nebraska Press
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In 1908 two young women—the authors of this book—accepted Indian Service appointments as field matrons for the Karok Indians in the Klamath and Salmon River country of northern California. Although the area had been the scene of a gold rush some fifty years earlier, they write in the foreword, "the social life of the Indian—what he believed and the way he felt about things—was very little affected by white influence. The older Indians still had the spaced tatoo marks on their forearms, by which they could measure the length of the string of wampum required to buy a wife. . . . The white men we knew on the Rivers were pioneers of the Old West. . . . All around us was gold country, the land of the saloon and of the six-shooter. Our friends and neighbors carried guns as a matter of course, and used them on occasion. But the account given in these pages is not of these occurrences but of everyday life on the frontier in an Indian village, and what Indians and badmen did and said when they were not engaged in wiping out their friends and neighbors. It is also the account of our own two years in Indian country where, in the sixty-mile stretch between Happy Camp and Orleans, we were the only white women, and most of the time quite scared enough to satisfy anybody."

Indigenous Peoples and the Collaborative Stewardship of Nature

Indigenous Peoples and the Collaborative Stewardship of Nature Author Anne Ross
ISBN-10 9781315426594
Year 2016-09-16
Pages 320
Language en
Publisher Routledge
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Involving Indigenous peoples and traditional knowledge into natural resource management produces more equitable and successful outcomes. Unfortunately, argue Anne Ross and co-authors, even many “progressive” methods fail to produce truly equal partnerships. This book offers a comprehensive and global overview of the theoretical, methodological, and practical dimensions of co-management. The authors critically evaluate the range of management options that claim to have integrated Indigenous peoples and knowledge, and then outline an innovative, alternative model of co-management, the Indigenous Stewardship Model. They provide detailed case studies and concrete details for application in a variety of contexts. Broad in coverage and uniting robust theoretical insights with applied detail, this book is ideal for scholars and students as well as for professionals in resource management and policy.